APRIL 16-18, 2019

BOSTON, MA USA

The 6th Annual Translational Microbiome Conference is Coming Back to Boston in April 2020. 

Please check back in the coming weeks for additional details.

The Official Blog of the Annual Translational Microbiome Conference

The official blog of the Annual Translational Microbiome Conference provides readers with information, insight and analysis regarding the microbiome.

Banking Your Personal Biome

(Guest Bloggers, Sasha Lieberman, Nonprofit Management Fellow and Carolyn Edelstein, Director of Policy and Global Partnerships, OpenBiome)

Mark Smith and James Burgess were inspired to found OpenBiome after a family friend who had suffered with repeated C. difficile infections shared his story of having to resort to performing a DIY fecal transplant at home. Since its founding in 2012, OpenBiome has been committed to enabling safe access to fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) by providing rigorously screened, ready-to-use microbiota preparations for use in FMT and by catalyzing research into the human microbiome.

This year, OpenBiome launched PersonalBiome, a pilot service that allows individuals who are at risk of contracting C. diff to preserve a copy of their healthy microbiome. In the event that these individuals do end up experiencing recurrent C. diff infections, participants can retrieve their sample from their PersonalBiome bank to repopulate their gut with their own healthy microbial community. PersonalBiome pushes OpenBiome’s mission to provide safe microbiota treatments from its pool of universal stool donors forward by expanding the available options for repopulating the gut microbiome following a C. diff infection.

In some ways, the service resembles that of private umbilical cord blood banking. A practice that began in the early 1990s, cord blood banking is now undertaken by a network of over 100 cord blood banks and transplant centers that have stored over 400,000 units of cord blood worldwide. The vast majority of banked cord blood is for use by unrelated donors, but private banks have arisen to give families the option of storing their own cord blood, a service that is most useful for those with family members who have a current or potential need for a stem cell transplant.

Current FDA regulations governing FMT only permit physicians to treat patients with FMT outside of a clinical trial, if the patient experiences repeated, unresolvable C. diff. These regulations apply equally to one’s own stool as well as stool from a universal bank. However, co-founder and executive director James Burgess, featured in this recent FastCompany article about the PersonalBiome pilot project, envisions a future in which high-risk patients can bank their microbiomes to help prevent and treat other microbiome-associated diseases.

Individuals who would like to learn more about participating in the PersonalBiome pilot launch should contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or visit www.openbiome.org/personalbiome. To learn more about OpenBiome and what we do, visit www.openbiome.org.

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Wednesday, 19 June 2019

About Us

Our events give attendees a conference experience that encompasses learning, networking and professional growth. We strive to facilitate connections. At our events, attendees, speakers, sponsors and exhibitors have opportunities to network and then to utilize those connections to further their professional goals. At Arrowhead Publishers, our focus is on bringing life sciences industry professionals together to help move research forward. Learn more about us at www.arrowheadpublishers.com.

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Chanhassen, MN 55317
866-945-0263
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PRIVACY POLICY

NEW EVENT JUST ANNOUNCED

The Microbiome-Vaccine Summit: Microbiome-Mediated Immunity and the Future of Vaccines

Dates and Location: September 2019 | London, United Kingdom

Microbes in the gut have been found to exert profound control over the immune system. The role of the microbiome in modulating the immune response has already been substantially researched with numerous correlations between the microbiome’s immune effects and disease hypothesized and being explored. One exciting area of inquiry is the potential for the microbiome to play a substantial role in vaccine response. This area of exploration includes:

♦ Its potential to change how patients respond to checkpoint inhibition therapy for metastatic melanoma
♦ Correlations between the efficacy of the rotavirus and geographic differences in the gut biome
♦ How the antibiotic-mediated dysbiotic gut microbiome may actually mount a strong immune response to the seasonal flu vaccine
♦ And the gut-lung axis, or the role of the microbiome in the meteoric rise of asthma
♦ And even the possibility of explaining why some children experience adverse reactions to vaccinations, and why our current vaccine protocol starting within 12 hours of birth does not properly factor gut microbiota as crucial to immune response.

An extension of the highly successful Arrowhead Translational Microbiome Conference held every April in Boston, join us for this first event in our Translational Microbiome Spotlight series, where we bring together industry and academic experts considering the interface between the microbiome and vaccines in a one day, highly interactive roundtable forum.

CLICK HERE to request more information. If you are interested in speaking or sponsorship opportunities, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..